paperstreet-soapcompany:

a moment of silence for the english teachers that have to read angsty 13 year old creative writing

andishouldhavekissedyou:

The stiffmeister just got real.

andishouldhavekissedyou:

The stiffmeister just got real.

taiikawaii:


trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.
As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

if you don’t think this is fucking rad then get out of my face

taiikawaii:

trilliansthoughts:

This miniature ecosystem has been thriving in an almost completely isolated state for more than forty years. It has been watered just once in that time.

The original single spiderwort plant has grown and multiplied, putting out seedlings. As it has access to light, it continues to photosynthesize. The water builds up on the inside of the bottle and then rains back down on the plants in a miniature version of the water cycle.

As leaves die, they fall off and rot at the bottom producing the carbon dioxide and nutrients required for more plants to grow.

if you don’t think this is fucking rad then get out of my face

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve worked to eradicate Malaria my entire life, and I used to drive out into the rural areas all the time to do my work. I’d carry large amounts of money without any fear. People would know that I had money with me and nobody would bother me. But things have changed. People have grown desperate, and desperate people do bad things. The population has grown in Mexico much faster than the infrastructure, and there just aren’t enough jobs to support everyone. My company had a job opening recently, and all the job required was a high school diploma, but 400 people showed up with college degrees. And that was for a job that only paid $350 a month! All Mexicans need are jobs. We are not a lazy people. Give us a job and we won’t sleep if it’s necessary. We’ll eat our lunch while we are working. We will work 15 hours a day to dig a hole 10 kilometers deep, if that is what you ask us to do. Because for us, all work is a blessing."
(Mexico City, Mexico)

humansofnewyork:

"I’ve worked to eradicate Malaria my entire life, and I used to drive out into the rural areas all the time to do my work. I’d carry large amounts of money without any fear. People would know that I had money with me and nobody would bother me. But things have changed. People have grown desperate, and desperate people do bad things. The population has grown in Mexico much faster than the infrastructure, and there just aren’t enough jobs to support everyone. My company had a job opening recently, and all the job required was a high school diploma, but 400 people showed up with college degrees. And that was for a job that only paid $350 a month! All Mexicans need are jobs. We are not a lazy people. Give us a job and we won’t sleep if it’s necessary. We’ll eat our lunch while we are working. We will work 15 hours a day to dig a hole 10 kilometers deep, if that is what you ask us to do. Because for us, all work is a blessing."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

midcenturyamericana:

How World War II Led to the Invention of the Pony Car
(From the book “The All American Muscle Car: The Birth, Death and Resurrection of Detroit’s Greatest Performance Cars.” This excerpt was written by Randy Leffingwell)
Detroit muscle cars gave enthusiasts hot rods with warranties. They also proved to be good business for the automakers.
They intercepted the profits that independent speed shops earned and shifted them onto corporate spreadsheets.
Pony cars proved to be even better business because they made muscle cars acceptable, turning them into vehicles their owners could drive to work through the week, to the market on Saturday morning, and to the drag strip or the movies on Saturday night.
Pony cars were the kind of muscle cars that doctors, bankers, and teachers could drive to church on Sunday morning.
For decades, historians have credited product planners and marketing types with inventing muscle cars.
The common premise is that American GIs returned from the wars in Europe and Korea with combat pay in their pockets and a desire for speed and horsepower in their souls.
But that theory doesn’t go far enough, and it doesn’t dig back long enough or reach out broadly enough.
During World War II, automotive engineers spent their time designing better bombsites, improved tank turrets, stronger truck suspensions, and superior aircraft engines.
Those who worked with engines and carburetion became familiar with lighter metals, higher engine speeds, and superior intake and exhaust management.
They were antsy to put that knowledge into the next automobile engine they designed.
Automobile engine designers invented the muscle that went into the car.
Product planners, advertising wizards, and corporate chairmen certainly had imagination and vision. They are the ones who asked for an automobile with a long hood and short rear deck, with two front bucket seats and two occasional ones in back, with red-stripe tires and four-speed floor shifts, and they chose evocative names like Mustang, Camaro, and Barracuda.
They “invented” pony cars. But very few of them imagined they should ask for a 221-cubic inch V-8 with thin walls or a 351 or a 429.
Or to add two additional bolts to each crankshaft bearing cap. Or to increase the carburetor size from one barrel to two or four and to specify 780 cubic feet per minute of air induction capacity. Mounted on a high-rise manifold. With ram air induction. In many cases, engine displacements resulted from size rules in racing classes.
Engineers thrived on the challenge of dividing up the cylinder dimensions of bore and stroke.

midcenturyamericana:

How World War II Led to the Invention of the Pony Car

(From the book “The All American Muscle Car: The Birth, Death and Resurrection of Detroit’s Greatest Performance Cars.” This excerpt was written by Randy Leffingwell)

Detroit muscle cars gave enthusiasts hot rods with warranties. They also proved to be good business for the automakers.

They intercepted the profits that independent speed shops earned and shifted them onto corporate spreadsheets.

Pony cars proved to be even better business because they made muscle cars acceptable, turning them into vehicles their owners could drive to work through the week, to the market on Saturday morning, and to the drag strip or the movies on Saturday night.

Pony cars were the kind of muscle cars that doctors, bankers, and teachers could drive to church on Sunday morning.

For decades, historians have credited product planners and marketing types with inventing muscle cars.

The common premise is that American GIs returned from the wars in Europe and Korea with combat pay in their pockets and a desire for speed and horsepower in their souls.

But that theory doesn’t go far enough, and it doesn’t dig back long enough or reach out broadly enough.

During World War II, automotive engineers spent their time designing better bombsites, improved tank turrets, stronger truck suspensions, and superior aircraft engines.

Those who worked with engines and carburetion became familiar with lighter metals, higher engine speeds, and superior intake and exhaust management.

They were antsy to put that knowledge into the next automobile engine they designed.

Automobile engine designers invented the muscle that went into the car.

Product planners, advertising wizards, and corporate chairmen certainly had imagination and vision. They are the ones who asked for an automobile with a long hood and short rear deck, with two front bucket seats and two occasional ones in back, with red-stripe tires and four-speed floor shifts, and they chose evocative names like Mustang, Camaro, and Barracuda.

They “invented” pony cars. But very few of them imagined they should ask for a 221-cubic inch V-8 with thin walls or a 351 or a 429.

Or to add two additional bolts to each crankshaft bearing cap. Or to increase the carburetor size from one barrel to two or four and to specify 780 cubic feet per minute of air induction capacity. Mounted on a high-rise manifold. With ram air induction. In many cases, engine displacements resulted from size rules in racing classes.

Engineers thrived on the challenge of dividing up the cylinder dimensions of bore and stroke.

The All American Muscle Car

drowninginyoursmile:

heyfunniest:

Russell Brand telling Westboro Baptist what’s up.

I will reblog this until my fingers bleed.

bananakarenina:

sirartwork:

Because I could.

/chokes

bananakarenina:

sirartwork:

Because I could.

/chokes

shirtoid:

GRAFFETTI by inkOne is $10 today only (9/22) at Shirt Punch

shirtoid:

GRAFFETTI by inkOne is $10 today only (9/22) at Shirt Punch

I thought this was leading to something deep…I wasn’t disappointed.

pr1nceshawn:

Masculine Ways to Do Feminine Things by Dave Mercier.

its-awesome-turtle-time:

This is one of my favorite posts because that cat’s  name is  meatloaf

and hes just been sitting there with the money between his paws for who knows how long

-annoying:

the “i’m not afraid to verbally assault a middle schooler if they look at my kid the wrong way” haircut

image